Drugs

Growing up, it seemed like my family members were always on some type of medication. I don’t remember when it started, it just seems like they always took pills before bed. As the years passed I heard words like “high blood pressure” and “diabetes.” These words meant nothing to me at the time but now …

Continue reading “Drugs”

Growing up, it seemed like my family members were always on some type of medication. I don’t remember when it started, it just seems like they always took pills before bed. As the years passed I heard words like “high blood pressure” and “diabetes.” These words meant nothing to me at the time but now I know they were the reason my family members were taking those pills. For my interview I had a conversation with my parents. They had been taking their medications for a long time so they knew what they were taking and to my surprise they even knew about brand vs. generic names. When it came to talking about side effects and safe doses, I seemed to lose them. They had no clue about the safe doses of their medications, assuming the pharmacist and doctor knew what they were doing and that they would take care of them. I stressed the importance of information and especially with medications it’s not necessary to put all the faith in health care workers who are human and can make mistakes.

Drugs

Growing up, it seemed like my family members were always on some type of medication. I don’t remember when it started, it just seems like they always took pills before bed. As the years passed I heard words like “high blood pressure” and “diabetes.” These words meant nothing to me at the time but now … Continue reading “Drugs”

Growing up, it seemed like my family members were always on some type of medication. I don’t remember when it started, it just seems like they always took pills before bed. As the years passed I heard words like “high blood pressure” and “diabetes.” These words meant nothing to me at the time but now I know they were the reason my family members were taking those pills. For my interview I had a conversation with my parents. They had been taking their medications for a long time so they knew what they were taking and to my surprise they even knew about brand vs. generic names. When it came to talking about side effects and safe doses, I seemed to lose them. They had no clue about the safe doses of their medications, assuming the pharmacist and doctor knew what they were doing and that they would take care of them. I stressed the importance of information and especially with medications it’s not necessary to put all the faith in health care workers who are human and can make mistakes.

Evidence-Based Practice: Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

Acute respiratory distress syndrome can be life threatening and because of this it is important to use evidence-based practice in order to provide the patient with the best prognosis possible. Pathophysiology: “ARDS has three phases: the acute exudative phase, proliferative phase and fibrotic phase” ( Schreiber, 2018). 1-7 days after the initial trauma a systemic … Continue reading “Evidence-Based Practice: Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome”

Acute respiratory distress syndrome can be life threatening and because of this it is important to use evidence-based practice in order to provide the patient with the best prognosis possible.

Pathophysiology: “ARDS has three phases: the acute exudative phase, proliferative phase and fibrotic phase” ( Schreiber, 2018). 1-7 days after the initial trauma a systemic immune response is truggered causing the pulmonary vsculature to become more permeable. As fluid infiltrates the lungs and alveoli begin to fill pulmonary edema occurs. This prevents blood from being oxygenated and hypoxemia results.

Patient Care: Nursing care includes maintainging pulmonary function. This includes frequent assessments to identify hypoxia including respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, and arterial blood gases. When maintaining the oxygen saturation above 90% it is important to titrate oxygen appropriately to prevent hyperoxygenation. In patients on ventilators it is also important to “adhere to strict infection control measures coupled with ventilator bundle protocols” (Schreiber, 2018). In addition medication therapy may include antibiotics, brochodilators, vasopressors, diuretics, anxiolytics, analgesics, sedatives, and neuro-muscular blockade agents.

This disease process can progress rapidly which is why it is important to provide evidence based practices. It is up to the nurse to use skill and critical thinking to achieve the most beneficial outcomes.

Reference: Schreiber, M. L. (2018). Evidence-Based Practice. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome. MEDSURG Nursing, 27(1), 59-65.

Evidence-Based Practice: Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

Acute respiratory distress syndrome can be life threatening and because of this it is important to use evidence-based practice in order to provide the patient with the best prognosis possible. Pathophysiology: “ARDS has three phases: the acute exudative phase, proliferative phase and fibrotic phase” ( Schreiber, 2018). 1-7 days after the initial trauma a systemic … Continue reading “Evidence-Based Practice: Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome”

Acute respiratory distress syndrome can be life threatening and because of this it is important to use evidence-based practice in order to provide the patient with the best prognosis possible.

Pathophysiology: “ARDS has three phases: the acute exudative phase, proliferative phase and fibrotic phase” ( Schreiber, 2018). 1-7 days after the initial trauma a systemic immune response is truggered causing the pulmonary vsculature to become more permeable. As fluid infiltrates the lungs and alveoli begin to fill pulmonary edema occurs. This prevents blood from being oxygenated and hypoxemia results.

Patient Care: Nursing care includes maintainging pulmonary function. This includes frequent assessments to identify hypoxia including respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, and arterial blood gases. When maintaining the oxygen saturation above 90% it is important to titrate oxygen appropriately to prevent hyperoxygenation. In patients on ventilators it is also important to “adhere to strict infection control measures coupled with ventilator bundle protocols” (Schreiber, 2018). In addition medication therapy may include antibiotics, brochodilators, vasopressors, diuretics, anxiolytics, analgesics, sedatives, and neuro-muscular blockade agents.

This disease process can progress rapidly which is why it is important to provide evidence based practices. It is up to the nurse to use skill and critical thinking to achieve the most beneficial outcomes.

Reference: Schreiber, M. L. (2018). Evidence-Based Practice. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome. MEDSURG Nursing, 27(1), 59-65.

Evidence-Based Practice: Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

Acute respiratory distress syndrome can be life threatening and because of this it is important to use evidence-based practice in order to provide the patient with the best prognosis possible. Pathophysiology: “ARDS has three phases: the acute exudative phase, proliferative phase and fibrotic phase” ( Schreiber, 2018). 1-7 days after the initial trauma a systemic … Continue reading “Evidence-Based Practice: Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome”

Acute respiratory distress syndrome can be life threatening and because of this it is important to use evidence-based practice in order to provide the patient with the best prognosis possible.

Pathophysiology: “ARDS has three phases: the acute exudative phase, proliferative phase and fibrotic phase” ( Schreiber, 2018). 1-7 days after the initial trauma a systemic immune response is truggered causing the pulmonary vsculature to become more permeable. As fluid infiltrates the lungs and alveoli begin to fill pulmonary edema occurs. This prevents blood from being oxygenated and hypoxemia results.

Patient Care: Nursing care includes maintainging pulmonary function. This includes frequent assessments to identify hypoxia including respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, and arterial blood gases. When maintaining the oxygen saturation above 90% it is important to titrate oxygen appropriately to prevent hyperoxygenation. In patients on ventilators it is also important to “adhere to strict infection control measures coupled with ventilator bundle protocols” (Schreiber, 2018). In addition medication therapy may include antibiotics, brochodilators, vasopressors, diuretics, anxiolytics, analgesics, sedatives, and neuro-muscular blockade agents.

This disease process can progress rapidly which is why it is important to provide evidence based practices. It is up to the nurse to use skill and critical thinking to achieve the most beneficial outcomes.

Reference: Schreiber, M. L. (2018). Evidence-Based Practice. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome. MEDSURG Nursing, 27(1), 59-65.

Evidence-Based Practice: Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

Acute respiratory distress syndrome can be life threatening and because of this it is important to use evidence-based practice in order to provide the patient with the best prognosis possible. Pathophysiology: “ARDS has three phases: the acute exudative phase, proliferative phase and fibrotic phase” ( Schreiber, 2018). 1-7 days after the initial trauma a systemic …

Continue reading “Evidence-Based Practice: Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome”

Acute respiratory distress syndrome can be life threatening and because of this it is important to use evidence-based practice in order to provide the patient with the best prognosis possible.

Pathophysiology: “ARDS has three phases: the acute exudative phase, proliferative phase and fibrotic phase” ( Schreiber, 2018). 1-7 days after the initial trauma a systemic immune response is truggered causing the pulmonary vsculature to become more permeable. As fluid infiltrates the lungs and alveoli begin to fill pulmonary edema occurs. This prevents blood from being oxygenated and hypoxemia results.

Patient Care: Nursing care includes maintainging pulmonary function. This includes frequent assessments to identify hypoxia including respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, and arterial blood gases. When maintaining the oxygen saturation above 90% it is important to titrate oxygen appropriately to prevent hyperoxygenation. In patients on ventilators it is also important to “adhere to strict infection control measures coupled with ventilator bundle protocols” (Schreiber, 2018). In addition medication therapy may include antibiotics, brochodilators, vasopressors, diuretics, anxiolytics, analgesics, sedatives, and neuro-muscular blockade agents.

This disease process can progress rapidly which is why it is important to provide evidence based practices. It is up to the nurse to use skill and critical thinking to achieve the most beneficial outcomes.

Reference: Schreiber, M. L. (2018). Evidence-Based Practice. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome. MEDSURG Nursing, 27(1), 59-65.

What does this mean?

What does Cardiopulmonary Arrest mean to you? Brother: When your heart stops pumping. One of the chambers bro, something in your heart stops. Cousin: It means cardiac arrest. Do you know what MI means? Brother: No, nah. Cousin: Nope. What happens during CPR? Brother: You are pumping blood. You are doing the pumping of the … Continue reading “What does this mean?”

What does Cardiopulmonary Arrest mean to you?

Brother: When your heart stops pumping. One of the chambers bro, something in your heart stops.

Cousin: It means cardiac arrest.

Do you know what MI means?

Brother: No, nah.

Cousin: Nope.

What happens during CPR?

Brother: You are pumping blood. You are doing the pumping of the heart and pushing air in the lungs to get the heart pumping again.

Cousin: You are pumping blood to restore oxygen to the heart during cardiac arrest.

 

For some background, both my brother and cousin taking college classes at the community college. My brother has had some health care experience working in an assisted living setting, while my cousin has worked long term in at a grocery store.

This exercise seems to highlight the confusion that can arise when we use medical terminology in front of patients. Although these words have become common knowledge to those working in the medical field, words like “cardiopulmonary arrest” and “myocardial infarction” bring confusion to the average individual. I know in the workforce, many healthcare jobs require some kind of CPR training but even then, the purpose and mechanism of it can get lost in translation. This shows the importance of educating patients in common terms and phrases they can understand. Doing this not only reduces anxiety and fear regarding their condition but also helps increase awareness can help the patient feel more in control of their ailment.

After I asked my brother and cousin these questions, I made sure to clear any misconceptions they had and explained the terms for them in a way they would understand.

 

What does this mean?

What does Cardiopulmonary Arrest mean to you? Brother: When your heart stops pumping. One of the chambers bro, something in your heart stops. Cousin: It means cardiac arrest. Do you know what MI means? Brother: No, nah. Cousin: Nope. What happens during CPR? Brother: You are pumping blood. You are doing the pumping of the … Continue reading “What does this mean?”

What does Cardiopulmonary Arrest mean to you?

Brother: When your heart stops pumping. One of the chambers bro, something in your heart stops.

Cousin: It means cardiac arrest.

Do you know what MI means?

Brother: No, nah.

Cousin: Nope.

What happens during CPR?

Brother: You are pumping blood. You are doing the pumping of the heart and pushing air in the lungs to get the heart pumping again.

Cousin: You are pumping blood to restore oxygen to the heart during cardiac arrest.

 

For some background, both my brother and cousin taking college classes at the community college. My brother has had some health care experience working in an assisted living setting, while my cousin has worked long term in at a grocery store.

This exercise seems to highlight the confusion that can arise when we use medical terminology in front of patients. Although these words have become common knowledge to those working in the medical field, words like “cardiopulmonary arrest” and “myocardial infarction” bring confusion to the average individual. I know in the workforce, many healthcare jobs require some kind of CPR training but even then, the purpose and mechanism of it can get lost in translation. This shows the importance of educating patients in common terms and phrases they can understand. Doing this not only reduces anxiety and fear regarding their condition but also helps increase awareness can help the patient feel more in control of their ailment.

After I asked my brother and cousin these questions, I made sure to clear any misconceptions they had and explained the terms for them in a way they would understand.

 

What does this mean?

What does Cardiopulmonary Arrest mean to you? Brother: When your heart stops pumping. One of the chambers bro, something in your heart stops. Cousin: It means cardiac arrest. Do you know what MI means? Brother: No, nah. Cousin: Nope. What happens during CPR? Brother: You are pumping blood. You are doing the pumping of the …

Continue reading “What does this mean?”

What does Cardiopulmonary Arrest mean to you?

Brother: When your heart stops pumping. One of the chambers bro, something in your heart stops.

Cousin: It means cardiac arrest.

Do you know what MI means?

Brother: No, nah.

Cousin: Nope.

What happens during CPR?

Brother: You are pumping blood. You are doing the pumping of the heart and pushing air in the lungs to get the heart pumping again.

Cousin: You are pumping blood to restore oxygen to the heart during cardiac arrest.

 

For some background, both my brother and cousin taking college classes at the community college. My brother has had some health care experience working in an assisted living setting, while my cousin has worked long term in at a grocery store.

This exercise seems to highlight the confusion that can arise when we use medical terminology in front of patients. Although these words have become common knowledge to those working in the medical field, words like “cardiopulmonary arrest” and “myocardial infarction” bring confusion to the average individual. I know in the workforce, many healthcare jobs require some kind of CPR training but even then, the purpose and mechanism of it can get lost in translation. This shows the importance of educating patients in common terms and phrases they can understand. Doing this not only reduces anxiety and fear regarding their condition but also helps increase awareness can help the patient feel more in control of their ailment.

After I asked my brother and cousin these questions, I made sure to clear any misconceptions they had and explained the terms for them in a way they would understand.

 

What does this mean?

What does Cardiopulmonary Arrest mean to you? Brother: When your heart stops pumping. One of the chambers bro, something in your heart stops. Cousin: It means cardiac arrest. Do you know what MI means? Brother: No, nah. Cousin: Nope. What happens during CPR? Brother: You are pumping blood. You are doing the pumping of the … Continue reading “What does this mean?”

What does Cardiopulmonary Arrest mean to you?

Brother: When your heart stops pumping. One of the chambers bro, something in your heart stops.

Cousin: It means cardiac arrest.

Do you know what MI means?

Brother: No, nah.

Cousin: Nope.

What happens during CPR?

Brother: You are pumping blood. You are doing the pumping of the heart and pushing air in the lungs to get the heart pumping again.

Cousin: You are pumping blood to restore oxygen to the heart during cardiac arrest.

 

For some background, both my brother and cousin taking college classes at the community college. My brother has had some health care experience working in an assisted living setting, while my cousin has worked long term in at a grocery store.

This exercise seems to highlight the confusion that can arise when we use medical terminology in front of patients. Although these words have become common knowledge to those working in the medical field, words like “cardiopulmonary arrest” and “myocardial infarction” bring confusion to the average individual. I know in the workforce, many healthcare jobs require some kind of CPR training but even then, the purpose and mechanism of it can get lost in translation. This shows the importance of educating patients in common terms and phrases they can understand. Doing this not only reduces anxiety and fear regarding their condition but also helps increase awareness can help the patient feel more in control of their ailment.

After I asked my brother and cousin these questions, I made sure to clear any misconceptions they had and explained the terms for them in a way they would understand.

 

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