Drugs in Hematology and Immunology

Jane Han
acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin)

Route: PO
Purpose: prophylaxis of transient ischemic attacks and MI, pain, inflammatory disorders, and fever
Action: decrease platelet aggregation, produce analgesia and reduce inflammation and fever by inhibiti…

Jane Han
acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin)
aspirin
Route: PO
Purpose: prophylaxis of transient ischemic attacks and MI, pain, inflammatory disorders, and fever
Action: decrease platelet aggregation, produce analgesia and reduce inflammation and fever by inhibiting the production of prostaglandins
Side effects: tinnitus, GI bleeding, hepatotoxicity

Sports Injuries and Fractures

Jane Han
ORIF (Open Reduction with Internal Fixation)

1. Hospital Procedure
2. Prevent Infection
3. Cough & Deep Breathing
4. Physical Therapy
5. Elevate the Affected Limb Above the Heart

Jane Han
ORIF (Open Reduction with Internal Fixation)
orif
1. Hospital Procedure
2. Prevent Infection
3. Cough & Deep Breathing
4. Physical Therapy
5. Elevate the Affected Limb Above the Heart

Education for the Patient

Jane Han Colonoscopy I think patients learn best when they are ready to learn. For example, they may be concerned about diet restrictions or possible side effects of a colonoscopy procedure. Inherently, I would first want to discuss the process of the procedure and address diet restriction or side effects afterwards. But I think addressing … Continue reading Education for the Patient

Jane Han
Colonoscopy
colonoscopy
I think patients learn best when they are ready to learn. For example, they may be concerned about diet restrictions or possible side effects of a colonoscopy procedure. Inherently, I would first want to discuss the process of the procedure and address diet restriction or side effects afterwards. But I think addressing their concerns first before going over the procedure could better serve patient teaching and learning. A patient’s concern can contribute to feeling anxious. I think that once I address the concerns of the patient, they may be more open to learning. For example, in this scenario, I would first let them know that they will be on a clear liquid diet (fat free broth, vegetable juice, pulp free juice) starting the noon 1 day before, then review possible side effects like bloating and cramping, minor bleeding and unlikely, but possible perforation to the colon wall. Once they indicate that they are ready for further learning, I would then teach them what the procedure is and what to expect during the procedure, the reason for the procedure and what would happen if any abnormalities were indicated. I would share with them colon cleansing procedures like bowel preps and also let them know whether any of their current medications may be held or could still be taken. Mostly, I would assess the patient’s readiness to learn and use verbal communication for patient teaching.

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Christina Caranica Jane Han Physical examination includes assessing for numbness and tingling in the fingers, loss of grip, pain over the ventral aspect of the wrist with possible radiation to the palm and fingers, tight or swollen feeling in the hand, and/or temperature changes. Tinel’s sign is assessed by percussing lightly over the median nerve.  A … Continue reading Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

musculoskeletal-system-trauma-27-638

Christina Caranica

Jane Han

Physical examination includes assessing for numbness and tingling in the fingers, loss of grip, pain over the ventral aspect of the wrist with possible radiation to the palm and fingers, tight or swollen feeling in the hand, and/or temperature changes. Tinel’s sign is assessed by percussing lightly over the median nerve.  A positive test reports tingling, numbness, or pain at the site. Phalen’s sign test requires that the patient holds out their hands in front of him/her and flexes the wrist followed by dropping the hands down for 60 seconds.  Report of tingling, numbness or pain indicates a positive test.

Limitations related to mobility include pain, numbness, paresthesia, and weakness along the median nerve affecting the thumb, index, and middle finger.  Commonly seen is night pain and clenching upon awakening.

Patient teaching includes: minimizing excessive wrist movements (wringing, gripping and squeezing); using a wrist splint to rest the nerves and help the wrist maintain a neutral position; taking quick breaks and performing hand exercises that rotate and stretch the palm and fingers; and asking the doctor if surgery is an option-surgery can help relieve pressure, and prevent permanent nerve and muscle damage.

 

 

Effects of long term use of naproxen on the kidneys

Long term use of naproxen can lead to: renal papillary necrosis-death of the opening area of the collecting ducts that enter the kidney, renal insufficiency-poor regulation of blood pressure and ability to remove waste, and acute renal failure-acute shutdown in renal function.  

Long term use of naproxen can lead to: renal papillary necrosis-death of the opening area of the collecting ducts that enter the kidney, renal insufficiency-poor regulation of blood pressure and ability to remove waste, and acute renal failure-acute shutdown in renal function.