Disconnecting

I chose Sunday to disconnect from social media and spent the day with family. As hard it was to resist not using my computer to check emails or check social media, I noticed after a while my stress went down because I was not constantly checking my phone for texts and didn’t have to look … Continue reading “Disconnecting”

I chose Sunday to disconnect from social media and spent the day with family. As hard it was to resist not using my computer to check emails or check social media, I noticed after a while my stress went down because I was not constantly checking my phone for texts and didn’t have to look at emails about bills, deadlines, etc.

I know a lot of my stress comes from worrying about missing deadlines and keeping up with school and work, but it was actually very therapeutic to just put it down. I actually studied with just my textbook that day and did not use any apps to look up meds or look at PowerPoints which was a little inconvenient but I also had less distractions and felt I got more studying done.

Also, one thing I noticed is how rude and annoying it is when you talk to someone and they look at their phone or have to reply to texts. I feel I try my best to not do this, but it reminded me to stop looking at my phone or laptop while someone is talking because it really does take away the humanity of natural face to face communication.

Overall, I think technology is a blessing and a curse. It does help us succeed and makes life more convenient, but it also makes us take simple everyday things for granted because we miss the details when we are glued to a phone.

Post #2 – Drugs – Annie Alward

Choose one medication (your choice!): What information could you find about how it affects the kidneys, where it is absorbed, and/or other nursing considerations with renal patients? Using Skyscape, I researched the drug vancomycin, also referred to as Vancocin. Under the contraindications/precautions, it states that the drug must be used cautiously in patients with renal … Continue reading “Post #2 – Drugs – Annie Alward”

Choose one medication (your choice!): What information could you find about how it affects the kidneys, where it is absorbed, and/or other nursing considerations with renal patients?

Using Skyscape, I researched the drug vancomycin, also referred to as Vancocin. Under the contraindications/precautions, it states that the drug must be used cautiously in patients with renal impairment, requiring that dosage reduction occur if creatinine clearance is less than 80 mL per minute. It says their would be systemic absorption, and other nursing considerations are to monitor the patient during assessment before administering the medication. Lab test considerations include monitoring for casts, albumin, cells in urine, decreased specific gravity, CBC, and renal function during therapy. The medical app warns that the drug may cause increased BUN levels, so it is important to monitor during treatment. Also the drug is poorly absorbed from the GI tract, and IV vancomycin is almost entirely eliminated by the kidneys, another reason it is important to note kidney/renal impairment because a renal patient will excrete the dose faster. Also, the drug has an interaction warning with other nephrotoxic drugs because this drug can be harmful to kidneys, so it is important to avoid a drug-drug interaction by asking the patient about medications they take or have taken in the past to avoid those interactions.

Fluid and Electrolytes Post 1 – Annie Alward

The electrolyte I like the most is potassium because it is easy to remember and we focused on potassium deficit/excess and its signs and symptoms, so I definitely feel I am more familiar with the manifestations, causes, and the effect on the renal and cardiac organs. The electrolytes I like the least are phosphorus and … Continue reading “Fluid and Electrolytes Post 1 – Annie Alward”

dirtbikeThe electrolyte I like the most is potassium because it is easy to remember and we focused on potassium deficit/excess and its signs and symptoms, so I definitely feel I am more familiar with the manifestations, causes, and the effect on the renal and cardiac organs.

The electrolytes I like the least are phosphorus and calcium because their relationship can sometimes confuse me. When phosphorus and calcium occur together, it is usually a calcium deficit with a phosphorus excess and vice versa. High serum phosphate can cause low calcium, which sounds simple, but the relationships between electrolytes and their effects sometimes mix me up.

 

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