Clinton and Trump’s Views on Healthcare

I found this link that is the most unbiased article I have read about the topic. It discusses both what Clinton and Trump have stated they would want to do in regards to health care. This was written before the election took place. It covers multiple topics. I do not know all the logistics of … Continue reading Clinton and Trump’s Views on Healthcare

I found this link that is the most unbiased article I have read about the topic. It discusses both what Clinton and Trump have stated they would want to do in regards to health care. This was written before the election took place. It covers multiple topics. I do not know all the logistics of costs and insurance and such while working as a nurse because I am not in that role yet. Having said that, I am not entirely sure how the election will affect me as a future nurse, but look forward to reading other articles by you guys!

http://blog.supplementalhealthcare.com/patient-care-forum/how-2016-presidential-election-will-impact-healthcare

Bucks Traction–Genevieve Cragoe, Brianna Hanzmann, Kenyn Castaneda

The point of traction is to use a pulling force to maintain alignment to an injured body part. Traction can either be applied to the skin or directly to the bony skeleton. Bucks traction, specifically, is skin traction to the lower leg (it can be bilateral or unilateral). This causes either partial or temporary immobilization, … Continue reading Bucks Traction–Genevieve Cragoe, Brianna Hanzmann, Kenyn Castaneda

Image result for bucks traction

The point of traction is to use a pulling force to maintain alignment to an injured body part. Traction can either be applied to the skin or directly to the bony skeleton. Bucks traction, specifically, is skin traction to the lower leg (it can be bilateral or unilateral). This causes either partial or temporary immobilization, and is used for immobilization of fractures of the proximal femur and hip before corrective surgery.

Priority assessments include ensuring effective skin traction; the leg should be in a neutral position, and the bandage should be assessed to ensure there is no wrinkling or slipping of the bandage. Another important assessment is monitoring for skin breakdown, nerve damage, and circulatory impairment.

The patient’s mobility is limited. The only movement appropriate is for the patient to slightly shift position with assistance, but the patient should not move from side to side.

Usually a patient will have Buck’s traction before surgery, so discharge teaching would not be related to Buck’s traction, but rather about post-operative teaching. If the patient is to have Buck’s traction at home, it is important to encourage foot exercises every hour when awake to promote circulation. Also, the patient (if able–if not, ask a caregiver) should assess sensation in their legs and feet. A caregiver will be needed to assess for skin breakdown.

 

 

Penicillin G on the Kidneys

Penicillin G Potassium  is excreted by the kidneys. The administration of large amounts given by IV has been associated with renal tubular damage and interstitial nephritis. Sources: -http://www.rxlist.com/penicillin-g-potassium-side-effects-drug-center.htm -Skyscape

Penicillin G Potassium  is excreted by the kidneys. The administration of large amounts given by IV has been associated with renal tubular damage and interstitial nephritis.

Sources:

-http://www.rxlist.com/penicillin-g-potassium-side-effects-drug-center.htm

-Skyscape

A Little About Me

I had a really hard time deciding what picture to put on here to help describe me. But I thought of one of my favorite jokes; this picture can always make me smile. My favorite electrolyte is sodium. Not only because I like eating it, but also because how it functions in the body and … Continue reading A Little About Me

I had a really hard time deciding what picture to put on here to help describe me. But I thought of one of my favorite jokes; this picture can always make me smile.

land-before-time

My favorite electrolyte is sodium. Not only because I like eating it, but also because how it functions in the body and specifically the kidneys just makes sense to me.

My least favorite electrolyte I’d say is Phosphorus. Even though we just learned about it last week, I cannot remember what it is used for in the body and how our body reacts to too little or too much of it in the body.